D-DAY GIRLS by Sarah Rose

In 1942, an Allied victory was far from certain. Britain was barely holding its own after a battering in the Blitz and America was only just agreeing to enter the war. Using recently declassified files, diaries, interviews and more, Sarah Rose tells the stories of a handful of unlikely spies who paved the way for the Allied invasion.

ACCENT: THE NEVER-OPEN DESERT DINER

Ben is a delivery driver, bringing sundry items to a forgotten stretch of road in the Utah desert. His days as a driver are likely numbered if he isn’t able to collect some of the money owed to him, but he can’t bear to pressure the odd assortment of people on his route. Walt is…

REVIEW: THE WITCH OF LIME STREET by David Jaher

There are few topics I find more fascinating than the rise of Spiritualism in the early 20th century — and Houdini’s determination to rebuke it. Add to it the real life friendship — and falling out — between the master of magic and the creator of Sherlock Holmes, and it’s almost too good to be…

REVIEW: QUEEN OF THE AIR by Dean Jensen

I love stories about the circus — and magicians, performers, and theatres — , particularly in this era.   There is something about the great gulf between the reality of the grueling life and the sparkling image that was maintained for the crowds.  Unforgiving schedules, primitive travel, punishing physical feats were all typical of even…

REVIEW: THE BEDLAM DETECTIVE by Stephen Gallagher

My frequent readers will no doubt sigh and shake their heads at me for reading another English Victorian – set novel to do with murder and madness.  I know what I like – what can I do?  But this book was different.  While it used the framework of a Victorian sensational novel (although it’s technically…