Making a Murderous Film

When Alfred Hitchcock was searching for his next film idea, he came across the book She Who Was No More by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac. He inquired about the rights and found someone had beat him to it. It was already being adapted for the big screen by Henri-Georges Clouzot. It would become the intense…

REVIEW: IN A DARK, DARK WOOD by Ruth Ware

  In an interview with NPR, author Ruth Ware said someone mentioned the idea of mixing the “English country house murder” genre with a modern-day hen (bachelorette) party — and she thought it was brilliant. So often the hens don’t know one another or haven’t seen each other in years. It’s already awkward. Ware expands…

REVIEW: MIND OF WINTER by Laura Kasischke

This is a brilliant, searingly creepy, psychological thriller — reminiscent of A Rose for Emily. Though written in the third person, it is entirely told from one point of view and in a type of stream of consciousness. It’s rather like what it would be like if you wrote down every thought and memory that passed through…

ACCENT: A PLEASURE AND A CALLING by Phil Hogan

  It is every bit as creepy as the cover implies. Mr Heming is a quiet realtor in a tiny English town. Many of his neighbors couldn’t tell you his name, if they noticed him at all. He goes about his business efficiently, under the radar. But he’s not your typical realtor. Mr Heming makes…

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