Book Reviews

A Cineaste’s Bookshelf

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REVIEW: SOPHIA by Anita Anand

At the end of the Victorian era, the women’s suffrage movement had an unexpected supporter. Sophia Duleep Singh was the daughter of the latest deposed Maharajah of Lahore, in India. As a teenager we was forced to give up his …
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Tales from Arabia

RIVER OF INK by Paul M. M. Cooper An historical fable, full of rich exoticism, this book uses the tradition of epic saga and brilliant storyteller — like Scherazade. Asanka is the royal poet of a kingdom in Sri Lanka. …
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Making a Murderous Film

When Alfred Hitchcock was searching for his next film idea, he came across the book She Who Was No More by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac. He inquired about the rights and found someone had beat him to it. It was …
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REVIEW: THE STARGAZER'S SISTER by Carrie Brown

In the mid 18th century, Caroline Herschel became the first woman to discover a comet. Sister of noted astronomer William Herschel, she had no rigorous formal education — only a curious mind and a supportive brother. Caroline — Lina — …
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If on a winter's night, a book...

I shifted my reads for December to mid-month in anticipation of the upcoming winter break. Many of us will have several days off to relax, visit, nap, and most importantly, READ. These are some books that will help you forget …
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REVIEW: THE DEAD ASSASSIN by Vaughn Entwistle

The second entry in the series focuses on inner London, with a steampunk, resurrectionist twist. It’s 1895 and the industrialist Victorian era has reached fever pitch. Factories are making their owners rich — and keeping their workers poor and desperate. …
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Books for November

“O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn’s being. Thou, from whose unseen presence the leaves dead Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing.” –  Percy Bysshe Shelley It’s time for NaNoWriMo, so my book reviews are likely to be …
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Welcome to NIGHT VALE

“Listeners, we are currently fielding numerous reports that books have stopped working. It seems that all over Night Vale, books have simply ceased functioning. The scientists are studying one of the broken books to see if they can understand just …
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REVIEW: DE POTTER'S GRAND TOUR by Joanna Scott

The sun had not yet set on the Gilded Age when Armand De Potter disappeared. In 1905, Europe was still, officially, at peace and the best families still considered a grand tour part of every civilised life. De Potter set …
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BOOKS for October

Especially when the October wind (Some let me make you of autumnal spells, The spider-tongued, and the loud hill of Wales) With fists of turnips punishes the land, Some let me make you of the heartless words. The heart is …
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ACCENT: A IS FOR ARSENIC - The Poisons of Agatha Christie

Fourteen Agatha Christie novels. Fourteen poisons. Just because it’s fiction doesn’t mean it’s all made-up …
 Today is the 125th birthday of Agatha Christie. Few readers can claim they don’t know her. Exceedingly prolific, she has never been out of …
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REVIEW: IN A DARK, DARK WOOD by Ruth Ware

  In an interview with NPR, author Ruth Ware said someone mentioned the idea of mixing the “English country house murder” genre with a modern-day hen (bachelorette) party — and she thought it was brilliant. So often the hens don’t …
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BOOKS FOR SEPTEMBER

  THE HISTORIES by Herodotus Ever since seeing The English Patient, I’ve meant to read The Histories (“Am I K in your book?). Tom Holland has worked with Penguin Classics to publish a new translation. Having studied Latin in high school and some …
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REVIEW: THE RACE FOR PARIS by Meg Waite Clayton

As the Normandy invasion’s ground forces advanced across the French countryside, the obvious objective was to liberate Paris. Allied forces crept at a snail’s pace, encountering mine fields and holdouts along the way. In 1940, when Paris surrendered to Nazi …
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Quick Stories

As much as we all want several hours on end to read that massive epic novel, it’s not always realistic. Especially when the laundry needs folding and sometimes (only sometimes) you need to sleep. I’ve found it to be a …
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